Policy briefs

Women’s Economic Engagement and Childcare: Moving from Survival to a ‘Triple Boon’

Chopra, Deepta; Nazneen, Sohela; Krishnan, Meenakshi, 9 October 2019

Women’s childcare responsibilities are often seen as a barrier to them undertaking paid work. However, this is a two-way interaction, mediated by large quantities of unpaid work. Women thus find themselves in a downward spiral of a ‘triple burden’ consisting of (a) time‑consuming, yet unpaid work with no economic returns to them; (b) informal and back‑breaking low-paid work; and (c) supervisory childcare and domestic tasks like cooking, cleaning, and fetching water and fuel. This policy brief provides recommendations to reverse this spiral to achieve a ‘triple boon’ such that women are able to engage economically in decent paid work; undertake less drudgerous unpaid work tasks with control over any economic returns; and receive support for redistributing their childcare and domestic chores.

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A Trapeze Act: Balancing Unpaid Care Work and Paid Work by Women in Nepal

Ghosh, Anweshaa; Singh, Anjam; Kayastha, Bibhor, June 2017

Women in paid work from low income families are engaged in poorly paid, precarious employment, even as they are overburdened with unpaid care work responsibilities. This double burden has depleting consequences for both their mental and physical wellbeing, as well as those of their children. Women’s economic empowerment programmes have to both improve the options and conditions of women’s paid work and recognise, reduce and redistribute their unpaid care work burdens for these women to move from a double burden to a “double boon”.

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From Double Burden of Women to a “Double Boon”: Balancing Unpaid Care Work and Paid Work

Sengupta, Sudeshna; Sachdeva, Shubhika, May 2017

Women in paid work from low income families are engaged in poorly paid, precarious employment, even as they are overburdened with unpaid care work responsibilities. This double burden has depleting consequences for both their mental and physical wellbeing, as well as those of their children. For women in these contexts to move from a double burden to a “double boon”, women’s economic empowerment programmes have to both improve the options and conditions of women’s paid work and recognise, reduce and redistribute their unpaid care work burdens.

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