Unpaid care work in Uganda

Uganda is one of four focus countries in ActionAid’s programme on women’s unpaid care work. ActionAid created a participatory time use tool that participants in each country could use to measure the time and energy they spend on unpaid care work. In Uganda more women participants headed up their own households than in other countries. There were differences between rural and urban women, with rural women spending more time on unpaid GDP work. Women in rural Pallisa mainly worked on their families’ small plots of land, farming both food and cash crops, and looking after livestock - types of work are generally unpaid. Women in peri-urban Bwaise worked as small scale traders, domestic workers and bar attendants.

Graphic showing minutes per day spent on childcare in Uganda: 186 for women, 27 for men

Gender balance of childcare in Uganda. Taken from ActionAid Making Care Visible programme

Making care work visible

This short video explains how women struggle on a daily basis to make ends meet, amidst their care roles. ActionAid Uganda are calling on the government to provide subsidized day care facilities to enable women pursue their sources of livelihoods with a peace of mind. 

Uganda programme report

Unpaid Care Work Programme: Uganda Country Progress Report (2012–2014). Nesbitt-Ahmed, Z. and Malinga Apila, H. (2015)

This report covers the progress of the Unpaid Care Work (UCW) programme in Uganda over the first two and a half years of the four-year programme. For a programme aimed at influencing national policy, it is critical to understand the political economy context of Uganda.

Evidence report

Latest updates

14.10.15Uganda: Involving men and women in care work

This case study report from Oxfam focuses on value chain development (VCD) in Uganda and argues that it is possible to change gender norms and relations that have existed for generations, improving development outcomes significantly. It highlights that unpaid care work and unequal division of labour between women and men are largely invisible in development policy and programmes.

Zahrah Nesbitt-Ahmed and Hellen Malinga Apila report on the progress of the programme in Uganda over the first two and a half years of the four-year programme. For a programme aimed at influencing national policy, The report provides an update on the political economy context and the successes, challenges and key lessons learnt by Action Aid Uganda in making unpaid care work more visible in the country.

31.03.15Video: Making care visible in Uganda

This short video explains how women struggle on a daily basis to make ends meet, amidst their care roles. ActionAid Uganda are calling on the government to provide subsidized day care facilities to enable women pursue their sources of livelihoods with a peace of mind. 

Gender equality in Uganda

Women and girls in Uganda face a range of inequalities, including lack of economic self sufficiency, greater risk of HIV/AIDS, and vulnerability to gender based violence. The Committee of the Convention on the Elimination of All Forms of Discrimination against Women (CEDAW) most recently examined Uganda in 2010. It noted an increase in policies, programmes and legislation around gender equality in Uganda, but reported its concerns about the persistence of discrimination against women and girls in education, public life, decision-making, marriage, family relations and health. While the proportion of girls in primary school has been rising, there remains a clear literacy gap between women and men, and girls’ dropout rates from school are higher than those of boys. Discrimination against women in the labour market is persistent. There is a high rate of unemployment affecting women and a wide wage gap between women and men. Female headed households are disproportionately represented among the chronically poor and women have limited access to land, capital and microfinance facilities.

The country was ranked 73 out of 86 in the 2012 Social Institutions and Gender Index. It was ranked 85 out of 155 in the 2012 Social Watch Gender Equity Index.

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