Women's economic empowerment

Theme Id: 
4

Balancing paid work and unpaid care work

IDS AG Id: 
OT/11009/3/4
Eldis Subject Id: 
C2059

Are Women Not ‘Working’? Interactions between Childcare and Women’s Economic Engagement

This paper seeks to examine how childcare impacts upon women’s economic engagement in India, Nepal, Tanzania, and Rwanda. In delineating the linkages between childcare, paid work, and other tasks that women carry out within and outside the house, this paper privileges women’s own perceptions of childcare as ‘work’, and the extent to which they see this as a tension between women’s caregiving role and their income-generating role. Our findings corroborate that women experience significant trade-offs as they engage in both market activities and childcare tasks.

From Double Burden of Women to a “Double Boon”: Balancing Unpaid Care Work and Paid Work

Women in paid work from low income families are engaged in poorly paid, precarious employment, even as they are overburdened with unpaid care work responsibilities. For women in these contexts to move from a double burden to a “double boon”, women’s economic empowerment programmes have to both improve the options and conditions of women’s paid work and recognise, reduce and redistribute their unpaid care work burdens.

A Trapeze Act: Balancing Unpaid Care Work and Paid Work by Women in Nepal

Women in paid work from low income families are engaged in poorly paid, precarious employment, even as they are overburdened with unpaid care work responsibilities. This double burden has depleting consequences for both their mental and physical wellbeing, as well as those of their children. Women’s economic empowerment programmes have to both improve the options and conditions of women’s paid work and recognise, reduce and redistribute their unpaid care work burdens for these women to move from a double burden to a “double boon”.

Women’s Economic Engagement and Childcare: Moving from Survival to a ‘Triple Boon’

This policy brief provides recommendations to reverse the downward spiral of a ‘triple burden’ to achieve a ‘triple boon’, such that women are able to engage economically in decent paid work; undertake less drudgerous unpaid work tasks with control over any economic returns; and receive support for redistributing their childcare and domestic chores.

Re-telling the story of women’s back-breaking lives in India, Nepal, Rwanda and Tanzania.

Drawing on evidence from our 126 short case studies, we produced four videos re-telling the stories of real women’s experiences trying to balance the demands of the family and the home with the need to earn an income. In these films, their stories have been adapted into a script, anonymised and narrated by an actor. The photos are from the region where the women are from, but not of the women or their families, themselves.

Video screenshot - womens back-breaking work

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